In Chivalry 2, everyone sees me coming from a mile away. I’m the screaming, flailing, occasionally jumping guy who’s about to die gruesomely. Usually I’m in good company, as this is not an uncommon approach to the newly-launched sequel’s combat. We don’t tend to last for very long. I’m unfazed by my many deaths, however, because when I’m flailing away in the moment, I feel unstoppable. 

Chivalry seems like a game for the skilled. In the tutorial, it teaches you a bunch of tricks that are intuitive, common sense things that, nonetheless, are easier said than done. You need precision, timing, and a tactical awareness that’s hard to muster after a couple of drinks, or indeed entirely sober. I grew into a fairly competent warrior in the original game, and after a few more cuts and bruises I hope the same will happen here, but in the meantime I’m having lots of fun being an idiot. 

In Tyler’s most recent impressions, he notes that “the better you get, the more fun it is”, but it’s still a blast when you’re utterly clueless—and not as punishing as you might think. See, while you will absolutely get decapitated plenty of times, you’re never that far from the action. There’s a brilliant momentum that means, aside from the few seconds of waiting for the respawn timer to finish, you’re always either in a fight or charging towards one. It encourages recklessness, but being reckless is a hoot. 

(Image credit: Torn Banner)

When you respawn or start a match, you begin mid-charge, usually surrounded by other people getting very excited about running fast and screaming. It gets the blood pumping, making you feel like a tank about to smash into a horde of surprised enemies. Then you unleash the opening salvo, maybe even getting a kill straight away. That momentum also makes you a heavy hitter. It’s likely, of course, that they’ll be waiting for you, and then you’ll be the one spraying buckets of blood everywhere. But it’s fine, because in a few seconds you’ll be in the middle of a charge again. 


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